Nov 27, 2020

Talisman of the Darktide

After a brief visit from the sun this week, the gloom has enfolded our valley again. I don't mind the feeling of snow approaching over the mountains, or the near-constant scent of woodsmoke from the hard working chimneys in the village. It's a cozy sort of bleakness, to be sure. The birdfeeder is stocked for our outdoor friends, and the oven has been put to good use as the temperature drops and the wind howls at the door. I'm prepared to meet winter, although I'd prefer it to arrive late and then excuse itself early.

The light rushes off hastily on these late November afternoons. I half expect to see a rabbit clutching a pocket watch, racing ahead of it. The shadows slip in early now that the sun is rising and setting further and further toward the south. The brightest glow in the sky seems to be the moon, which is swelling toward full and will peak on the evening of the 29th into the early morning of the 30th. With the trees bare, the Winter Moon...Frost Moon...Beaver Moon...can easily be seen and swooned over. It is this particular shadow, these bare trees, and this full winter moon, that is the inspiration for our next giveaway. 


Pati Tozer, the extraordinary silver and gem artist in residence at Tree Speaks to Stone, has revived one of her stunning hand-cut silver talismans just for us. 

The Forest Holds the Moon is hand sawn sterling silver, from Pati's own original design. Hauntingly beautiful, it measures 36mm or approximately 1.4 inches in diameter, and hangs on dark and twisted (just the way we like it) silk cording from Japan. It has a brushed finish, and will look otherworldly hanging around your neck.


The captivating The Forest Holds the Moon pendant has been temporarily brought back to life for this winter only, and you can win one of the two pieces that will be created this year, before it returns to retirement. (If you don't win, you can always purchase the other pendant, which resides at Tree Speaks to Stone.)


If you would like to wear this enchanting charm into the winter months as your personal talisman, please leave a comment below. If you'd like a second entry for this draw, feel free to share either this post, or any of Pati's amazing art pieces, around on social media and then comment again and I'll drop your name in the hat once more.

You have until the full moon begins to fade on December 2nd to comment, and then I'll draw the name of the very lucky recipient. Please ensure your comment links back to you in some way or leave your email in a safe manner so I can contact you if you win. You may also use the "make contact" form in the sidebar (I have been receiving all the entries sent along this way, so no worries - your info makes it to me).

So, so many thanks to the incredible Pati, who has generously offered up her work for our darktide frolic this year! Here is the amazing shop again. And you can also find Pati on Instagram where you always get a first look at new creations and her wonderful world of silver and stones. 

And to those who feasted yesterday, I hope your gatherings were small and safe, and your tummies and hearts were full and happy. As we move into the celebratory season with earnest, I hope you will find comforts that, while they cannot replace large family gatherings, will help you feel warm and loved in ways that matter.



Legal Bits:

* This giveaway (or "sweepstakes") is open to all residents of Canada, (exluding Quebec residents) the USA, Great Britain, Europe, South America,  who are 18 years of age or older. This giveaway is void where prohitibited by law.  Please be aware of the contest/sweepstakes laws in your area.

*  Canadian residents will be subject to a skill testing question before being able to claim their prize (this is standard law in Canada).  The skill testing question will be in a form similar to: 1 + 2 - 1 =

*  This giveaway is not for profit and no purchase is necessary to enter.

*  This giveaway is sponsored/administrated solely by this blog/blog author and is not affilitated with or sponsored by Blogger, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or any other entity, nor can they be held liable.

* By leaving a comment intending to enter into the draw for the giveaway (or "sweepstakes") you are knowingly agreeing to these rules/conditions.

I have chosen all the books/cards featured this month myself.  I have not been paid to feature a book, nor have I been asked to advertise for anyone.  This giveaway is not endorsed or sponsored by anyone other than Rue and Hyssop.

Nov 20, 2020

Wisdom of the Darktide

Thank you to everyone who entered! (I've also been receiving all the email entries via the contact button as well - not to worry!) The folks who will be getting some holiday mail are:

Ask Baba Yaga - Book #1 - Maria O. 

Ask Baba Yaga - Book #2 - MrsDuncanMahogany

Literary Witches Book - dustbunny8

Literary Witches Oracle - eli mari

What Would Frida Do - Cartermaryd

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As we stride deeper into the darkest weeks of the year, it is prudent to be aware of the beings that reside in the shadows. Our own goblins lurk there, of course, though it is in our best interest to get to know them. But there are also those shades and spirits that slink alongside us, their interest in us piqued (for good or for mischief). There are numerous tales of things that live in the dark, or hunt in the bitterest months, and so it is shrewd to take precautions and arm ourselves with safeguards, including a healthy dose of cleverness and discernment. That is, after all, how most fairy tale protagonists get out of their predicaments.

As of today my province has tightened up some of the Covid precautions after our case numbers rose dramatically in the past weeks. We are not wholly quarantined again (for now) but we are not to gather anymore, and we must be masked in all buildings. There is a drawing-in that happens naturally this time of year, and so I've decided to weave these new restrictions into my own cold-weather enchantments. I see being masked as a form of invisibility work. A way to move about swiftly and purposefully, without being noticed or recognized (for the most part). Though I enjoy gathering with others, there is a stream of protection magic to tap into when you are forced to keep those who don't live in your home, away. I see the magic of the darktide as a solid ally to these difficult times. And it's always good to have someone, or something, in your corner.

This next giveaway features sage advice and guidance from literary and artistic women, as well as a good amount of advisement from a witch who rolls through the forest in a chicken-legged hut.


Taisia Kitaiskaia is a Russian-American writer who became widely lauded as the present-day voice of the oracle Baba Yaga in her column for The Hairpin. Two collections of those helpful and mysterious responses are now available in paperback, beautifully illustrated by Brenna Thummler: Ask Baba Yaga: Otherworldly Advice for Everyday Troubles and Ask Baba Yaga: Poetic Remedies for Troubled Times.
"Voices are ; noise, humanly noise — but what knows best in you is not of human shape or sound but of a stranger, Wilder beast. )Now it turns in your stomach, now it rends yr chest. Tell the voices to shut up & listen for the growl."

Kitaiskaia also dove into the world of historical and contemporary authors and resurfaced with the wonderful insights contained in Literary Witches: A Celebration of Magical Women Writers, and The Literary Witches Oracle, which is a deck containing the women mentioned in her book as well as cards inked with symbols and sigils created by illustrator Katy Horan.

The book reimagines 30 female authors as true witches: not hook-nosed creatures riding on brooms, but figures of radical creativity, originality, and empowerment. Each witch is celebrated with a surreal vignette by Taisia Kitaiskaia and a full-color portrait by artist Katy Horan. Brief biographies and recommended reading lists round out each entry, and a foreword by author, podcast host, and practicing witch Pam Grossman contextualizes the figure of the witch and her connection to language.


Next, I have a gorgeous tome by Arianna Davis, a brilliant Afro-Latinx author, and an adjunct professor at New York University. What Would Frida Do? A Guide to Living Boldly

What Would Frida Do? explores the feminist icon’s signature style, outspoken politics, and boldness in love and art, even in the face of pain and heartbreak. The book celebrates her larger than life persona as a woman who loved passionately and lived ambitiously, refusing to remain in her husband’s shadow. Each chapter shares intimate stories from her life, revealing how she overcame obstacles by embracing her own ideals.

In this charming read, author Arianna Davis conjures Frida’s brave spirit, encouraging women to persevere, to create fearlessly, and to stand by their own truths.

Think of these books and cards as having your own badass fairy godmother to chat with. I know you'll enjoy reading them in the dark nights to come.

I have one copy of each of these enlightening items to give away. I'll draw five names on November 25th at 9pm Pacific, and then you can wander into the woods outfitted with sharp insight from wild and wise women. 

Your comment counts as your entry. Please leave an email address or a linked comment so I can contact you if your name is drawn. If you'd like to share this giveaway on social media, that would be lovely - just pop back and let me know you did and I'll enter your name a second time. If you have a preference as far as which item you'd like to have next to you on a cold winter's night, let me know in your comment. I try as much as possible to match folks with their wishes.



Legal Bits:

* This giveaway (or "sweepstakes") is open to all residents of Canada, (exluding Quebec residents) the USA, Great Britain, Europe, South America,  who are 18 years of age or older. This giveaway is void where prohitibited by law.  Please be aware of the contest/sweepstakes laws in your area.

*  Canadian residents will be subject to a skill testing question before being able to claim their prize (this is standard law in Canada).  The skill testing question will be in a form similar to: 1 + 2 - 1 =

*  This giveaway is not for profit and no purchase is necessary to enter.

*  This giveaway is sponsored/administrated solely by this blog/blog author and is not affilitated with or sponsored by Blogger, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or any other entity, nor can they be held liable.

* By leaving a comment intending to enter into the draw for the giveaway (or "sweepstakes") you are knowingly agreeing to these rules/conditions.

I have chosen all the books/cards featured this month myself.  I have not been paid to feature a book, nor have I been asked to advertise for anyone.  This giveaway is not endorsed or sponsored by anyone other than Rue and Hyssop.

Nov 13, 2020

Omens of the Darktide - A Trio of Tarot

The names drawn for these lovely decks were:

Tarot of the Divine: Laura S. Reading

Hoodoo Tarot: Maria's Blog

Modern Witch: Melisa G

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The deep grey has come to my village now. Low cloud, snow on the hills, mist on the water. We will wade through this bleakness for the next three months, until February begins to fade. It’s the price of living in a beautiful valley, surrounded by mountains. We forget during the year. Through the extraordinarily hot, dry summers, the lush springs and handsome autumns. But November reminds us. Winter here is little but grey. Unless you can get up the mountain, above the clouds into the sunlight, you need to find ways to weather the dark. Stacks of blankets and books. A fire. A stocked bar. Good snacks. And a host of friends (or a therapist) on speed dial. All are helpful.

The darktide offers much time, and the perfect ambiance, for introspection. It is the dark moon phase in earnest. We examine our depths. We call our power back to ourselves, cut cords, bump up wards, and might perhaps need to slap away a few pests that we've allowed to circle too closely. (This is, of course, work that we do all the calendar long, but it is especially suited for the shadowy phases of the year.) It is also the perfect time for prophesying. For looking ahead, and observing portents. The Omen Days, occuring around the darkest days in December, are an excellent example of this.

This next giveaway is meant to offer you some tools to look behind the curtain. Hopefully, the messages you receive will foretell of a bright future. We could use a happier 2021, for certain. 

This year I've found three tarot decks that have moved me in significant ways, and so I picked up a copy for you as well. They offer fairytales and magic. Black history, and BIPOC representation. Multiple cultures, and figures in all shapes and sizes. Let's take a look...

Tarot of the Divine - A Deck and Guidebook Inspired by Deities, Folklore and Fairy Tales from Around the World, by Yoshi Yoshitani


I'm completely enchanted with Tarot of the Divine. I was worried the art would be a bit too...soft...and the characters might lean toward quaint, but Yoshi has created substantial scenes and depth of feeling with her images. There were a few cards that touched me profoundly as I first flipped through the deck - one in particular made me gasp aloud. If I had any complaint at all with these cards it is that the cardstock is a little lighter than I would like (both in colour on the edges/frames, and in the weight). I know these aren't the cards I'm going to reach for in a rush. I wash my hands and shuffle them carefully when I pull them out. They are exceptionally fun to read with, in any case. 

Next up is The Hoodoo Tarot by author Tayannah Lee McQuillar and artist Katelan V. Foisy. This striking deck captured my attention the first time I saw it. I'm going to be honest - it is still in its box because I'm navigating some of my feelings about working with it as a white person with no Black or Indigenous heritage. This is entirely my own issue. Katelan Foisy is, from what I can determine from her online information, a white-presenting woman of Romani heritage, so this is certainly not a deck that speaks of being off-limits to people outside of the Black community.



"Celebrating the complex American Rootwork tradition, The Hoodoo Tarot integrates esoteric and botanical knowledge from Hoodoo with the divination system of the Tarot. Structured like a traditional Tarot deck, each of the 78 cards features full-color paintings by magical-realist artist Katelan Foisy and elegantly interprets the classical Tarot imagery through depictions of legendary rootworkers past and present as well as important Hoodoo symbolism.

In the accompanying guidebook, Tayannah Lee McQuillar provides a history of Hoodoo and its complex heritage, including its roots in multiple African and Indigenous American ethnic groups as well as its European influences. She explores the traditional forms of divination used by rootworkers, including cartomancy, explaining how pairing the Tarot with Hoodoo is a natural fit. For each card in the Major Arcana and the four suits of the Minor Arcana (sticks, baskets, needles, and knives), McQuillar provides an in-depth card meaning that draws on both Tarot and Hoodoo tradition. She shares the history of the rootworker or symbol featured, any associated magical plants, a related scriptural quote, and guidance and advice based on the card’s meaning. She also offers instructions on card spreads and shares sample card readings.

Offering a divination system rooted in the Indigenous and African experience in North America, The Hoodoo Tarot provides a hands-on way to honor and explore the magic of Hoodoo for personal growth and spiritual inspiration."

 

Lastly, we have the effervescent and delightful Modern Witch Tarot by Lisa Sterle. This deck takes the traditional symbolism of the Waite-Smith system and brings it into the modern era. The vibrant figures are all female or non-gender-specific, and of varying shapes and shades. The gorgeously inclusive art is a treat to behold!




I have one copy of each of these decks to give away. Do follow the links to the artist/author sites if you'd like a better a look at the cards (the weather has been so gloomy this week that I wasn't able to get out to my wooden bench to get good shots for you). 

Please leave a comment if you'd like your name in the hat, and ensure your comment links back to you in some way or you leave your email details (in a safe manner). Feel free to let me know which deck you might prefer, and I'll do my best to match up winners with their choices if possible. If you'd like to share this giveaway on social media or send folks my way, then I'll pop your name in the hat a second time - just let me know! If the comment form isn't working for you, or you'd prefer a bit more privacy, you can use the contact form in the sidebar. (Please note that I will be using your first name when I announce the winners.)

I will draw three names on Thursday, November 19th - good luck!




Legal Bits:

* This giveaway (or "sweepstakes") is open to all residents of Canada, (exluding Quebec residents) the USA, Great Britain, Europe, South America,  who are 18 years of age or older. This giveaway is void where prohitibited by law.  Please be aware of the contest/sweepstakes laws in your area.

*  Canadian residents will be subject to a skill testing question before being able to claim their prize (this is standard law in Canada).  The skill testing question will be in a form similar to: 1 + 2 - 1 =

*  This giveaway is not for profit and no purchase is necessary to enter.

*  This giveaway is sponsored/administrated solely by this blog/blog author and is not affilitated with or sponsored by Blogger, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or any other entity, nor can they be held liable.

* By leaving a comment intending to enter into the draw for the giveaway (or "sweepstakes") you are knowingly agreeing to these rules/conditions.

I have chosen all the books/cards featured this month myself.  I have not been paid to feature a book, nor have I been asked to advertise for anyone.  This giveaway is not endorsed or sponsored by anyone other than Rue and Hyssop.

Nov 5, 2020

Tales and Treats for the Darktide Giveaway - Haunting BIPOC Fiction


Thank you to everyone who came around to join in the fun and tossed their name in the hat here and via the contact button - the names drawn were:

Mexican Gothic - Rebecca P.

Hoodoo - petoskystone

Empire of Wild - Emily

Lovecraft Country - Duffi

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The wind is moaning outside my window, greedily tearing leaves from their high perch and tumbling them into amorphous, lurching things that skitter down the road until they are caught up in alleyways or up against fences. I can hear the neighbour's windchimes. They are no longer the melodious soundtrack to a languid summer day. Now they screech in a high-pitched banshee's wail, crashing together in the bitter November gusts. If there was an ambiance to the darktide - this would be it. Biting, howling winds. Moody, dusky days. The full moons, mad colour, and revelry of October, now fading into weeks of damp cold, gloomy afternoons, and endless nights. Could there be a more perfect time to light the fires? And once the bonfire has raged, the offerings tossed onto the flames, and the frenzied dancing concluded, is it not the moment to curl up with a blanket and a book and ignore the wolf prowling outside the door? I think it is.

If you've been around this neck of the woods during previous autumns, you will have surely stumbled across The Great October Book Giveaway. Originally meant as a way to thank readers of the blog and the lovely folks who have followed and/or befriended me on social media by passing out a few magical tomes during my favourite month of the year, it grew into a meandering game of trick-or-treat through tarot and cartomancy, art, herbalism, talismans, and more. Whenever something caught my attention in a big way, I picked up a second copy for you. Sometimes authors, publishers, and artists were incredibly generous and offered to share their creations with you too. It's become something I really look forward to each year and I love seeing so many familiar faces come back around to take part.

This year has been unlike anything most of us have experienced. I'm tired in ways I can barely articulate, and I know that many of you feel the same way. I had anticipated, when I bumped this giveaway back a month to give myself some breathing room, that there would be a collective sigh of relief and a new hope dawning as we began our celebration of the darktide. Instead, as I write this, ballots are still being counted in the US election and democracy is being challenged by the people who should be upholding it. But no matter the outcome, we will prevail. That's the thing about witches and wildlings - we are resilient and clever, and even if it seems we've been thwarted, well...you might want to salt your windows and sleep with the lights on. Because we always rise up, one way or another.

"A witch ought never to be frightened in the darkest forest, Granny Weatherwax had once told her, because she should be sure in her soul that the most terrifying thing in the forest was her." - Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

Onward, then, into the darkest weeks of the year. We will wear the fallen leaves and marauding mists as our cloak, and the scent of woodsmoke and the sweet rot of dying gardens as our perfume. What better time to begin this bacchanal than Bonfire Night! Two quarreling and discontent parties, each clamoring for more power and recognition, and one failed attempt at blowing up parliament. Sounds about right...


The first collection of books I have for you is a selection of haunting stories to give your goosebumps a workout. All but one of these novels is written by a BIPOC author, and all feature rich stories of suspense with BIPOC characters at the forefront of the action. This year was a time when many of us took a hard look at how we have participated in a world that placed People of Colour at a tremendous disadvantage as opposed to their white counterparts. We give top billing to white performers, artists, and authors. We offer financing and grants to white farmers. We patronize white-owned businesses. We read and watch white stories. All while Black and Indigenous peoples get ignored (or murdered). There are now multitudes of tips on how to support BIPOC businesses and individuals across various industries. There are fundraisers and ways to volunteer or support community organizations. There's really no reason to not have a more multi-cultural bookshelf, closet, medicine-cabinet, or donation receipts to hand to your tax accountant.

Only one of these books is a 2020 release, but all have captured my attention and made me shiver this autumn. I know you will enjoy them too. Here's what I have for you:

Mexican Gothic, by Silvia Moreno-Garcia - If having a cup of (possibly poisoned) tea in a creepy manor, while exchanging tales with Charlotte Bronte and Shirley Jackson sounds fun to you, this is your book.

Hoodoo, by Ronald L. Smith - This Young Adult book gave me some serious jitters at times, so don't let the fact that a twelve year old boy is the narrator make you think that this is a light read. Hoodoo Hatcher is from a folk magic practicing family and he has a mysterious stranger stalking him that he is going to have to deal with, one way or another. Chock full of magic, divination, dream walking, spirits, and symbolism, this book is a treasure, and the perfect read for a stormy night.

Empire of Wild, by Cherie Dimaline - A tale of a M├ętis woman who discovers her long lost husband is a wolf in sheep's clothing. Wild, yes. Supernatural. Poetic and base and beautiful. You'll want a good drink with this one.

Lovecraft Country, by Matt Ruff - A close and terrifying look at Jim Crow America from the point of view of its Black citizens who aren't just navigating a world rife with white supremacists, but one dotted with other monsters as well.

I will draw four names on November 12th, one for each book. You are welcome to let me know what book you'd like to receive if your name is drawn. I cannot promise you'll get your wish but I always do my best to match up folks with the items they prefer, if possible. 

Thank you so much for joining me again for the festivities. I think these darker, drearier days of November are going to be perfect for passing out gifts. I can't wait to get started!


For those of you that are new here, this is how these giveaways work:

We are running a simple game again this year - your comment counts as your entry. However, if you feel moved to share this around (either a specific giveaway or if you just send folks my way) you can leave another comment letting me know you spread the cheer, and I'll toss your name in the hat a second time.

On the evening of the draw, the winners will be notified via email and their names placed at the top of this post and the next handful of goodies will go up for grabs. Please, please, leave an email for me in your comment (in a safe format) if your name does not directly link to you/your website. I can't tell you how many names I've drawn only to find that I couldn't contact the winners. I simply draw again, but it is rather heartbreaking to see the first name get tossed.

There are occasionally some goblins that stop by in October, just for kicks. I am taking down the comment moderation security and we will hope that we skate under the spam radar again this year. Also, Blogger doesn't always play nice with every app, so there are times when you may have to come to the giveaway page directly (not via the FB app, for example) and leave a comment that way.

As always, if your privacy is of concern or if you simply cannot get your comment in on the current giveaway post for some reason, you can send an entry in using the "Make Contact" form in the sidebar.

All mail will go out within three business days of receiving the winner's address and will be sent via the most reasonable shipping rate. Please note that your parcel could take anywhere from 5 business days to reach you (in Canada) to five weeks (if you are in the EU or even the USA at this point - the USPS is a hot mess right now).

Legal Bits:

* This giveaway (or "sweepstakes") is open to all residents of Canada, (exluding Quebec residents) the USA, Great Britain, Europe, South America,  who are 18 years of age or older. This giveaway is void where prohitibited by law.  Please be aware of the contest/sweepstakes laws in your area.

*  Canadian residents will be subject to a skill testing question before being able to claim their prize (this is standard law in Canada).  The skill testing question will be in a form similar to: 1 + 2 - 1 =

*  This giveaway is not for profit and no purchase is necessary to enter.

*  This giveaway is sponsored/administrated solely by this blog/blog author and is not affilitated with or sponsored by Blogger, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or any other entity, nor can they be held liable.

* By leaving a comment intending to enter into the draw for the giveaway (or "sweepstakes") you are knowingly agreeing to these rules/conditions.

I have chosen all the books/cards featured this month myself.  I have not been paid to feature a book, nor have I been asked to advertise for anyone.  This giveaway is not endorsed or sponsored by anyone other than Rue and Hyssop.

Jun 21, 2020

The Blood, Dirt, Seeds, and Racism in my Garden

I stand at the kitchen window watching the sunlight gleaming through the white linens on the neighbour's clothesline. I am filling pastry shells with cinnamon-spiced apples, and I am thinking of my grandparents. My grandma had a long clothesline that stretched out past her rose garden. I wasn't permitted to fuss with it, but she let me run through the rest of the property without supervision. I preferred the company of the fruit trees in the small orchard, but sometimes I'd sit beneath the huge willow that guarded the tool shed (unless it was windy - that's when the caterpillars started dropping on you).

I didn't care much for her roses, (I would mourn the loss of them later, though.) I preferred the things growing in the vegetable garden. Grandma taught me about weeding and spacing and I taught myself which plants seemed to enjoy each other's company more, and how much sun they preferred, and what time of day they liked to be watered. I think she might have been pleased with my growing efforts this year. There is some wildness tumbling out of my beds, because I like the way plants will crawl over any barrier and I hate to prune them into submission. But the gardens look healthy, and I've already been stuffing myself with three varieties of lettuces and two kinds of peas, plus herbs and berries, for a few weeks now.


My grandfather was racist. I loved him more than I could ever say, and I never heard him speak a bad word about anyone. He helped his neighbours, volunteered, loved his family, and sang to the 'old folks' at the local retirement homes long into his 90's. But once I was old enough to start dating, my father warned me not to mention a beau to my grandfather if the boy was anything other than white. I was shocked. The family never talked about it.

Not talking about racism is how people end up being complicit in a system that oppresses Black, Brown, and Indigenous peoples. Like so many others, I've spent the last weeks in deep conversation with myself, my friends, parents, and nieces. I want to understand where I am causing harm, and how I have participated in societal 'norms' that kept People of Colour from being treated as equals in our communities, societies, the world. I am listening, reading, donating, making lists of Black-owned companies to give my business to, and these will never be finished tasks checked off a list. This work doesn't end. More importantly, it will never be enough. But I hope in the years I have left, to leave a much better trail behind me than those who came before me.

I am passionate about being able to feed and care for those I love, and my greater community, by growing food and medicine. This adoration for earth and seeds and green life was a direct result of growing up in close relationship with my grandparents. I've been privileged to have access to places to garden. I've had multiple beds on a good stretch of land to play with, but I've also managed to grow an impressive amount of food out of a dozen or so pots on a small patio outside a rental unit. I believe we can grow food almost anywhere.


Black gardeners and farmers have long been at a disadvantage. They were, and are, priced out of land ownership and refused for mortgages that white people of the same means were approved for. They are routinely forgotten or passed over when it comes to subsidies, operating farm loans, and benefits. It is long past time that gardeners, herbalists, and farmers of Colour are given the tools and means to feed and care for their families and communities, and make a sustainable living on their land. 

If you would like to support BIPOC gardeners and farmers, here are some places that are making a difference:


I cannot erase my grandfather's racism. But I can take the best of him and walk forward with the dirt under my nails, my choices, and my income, and do the work to support a better future than he could have imagined.